The Sun and the Moon

Sandaang Salaysay

A podcast series of Filipino folk tales for young people brought to us by Areté and the Ateneo de Manila Basic Education.

Listen to the story here or on Spotify.

Today’s podcast story is “The Sun and the Moon”, from Philippine Popular Tales by Dean S. Fansler1, to be read by Jose Felix D. Falgui.

Listen to the Story

Learning Guide

Prepared by Kristine Anne P. Valdellon and Jose Felix D. Falgui

A. Discussion Questions

What is your reaction to the fact that the stronger characters, Bathala and the Sun, are male characters, while the weaker one, and the one scarred for life is the female character, the Moon?

  1. Does this reflect a gender bias in the story?
  2. Where do you think this bias comes from?
  3. How can this bias be eliminated?
  4. Can you name strong characters that are female goddesses or chieftains?
  5. Does gender affect the characteristics of a ruler/leader? In what way?

B. Activity

The story suggests that family disputes may have great consequences not just for the members but for everyone around them. And that this reflects several truths about human life. Let us explore these truths by having a show.

  1. Conduct a puppet show or shadow play based on how you understood the story. This will reveal direct discourses from certain parts of the story such as the fight between the siblings and the moment when Mayari’s eye was put out by her brother.
  2. Have students point out those discourses and discuss as a group what human truths these reveal.

File Download

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Current Stories in the Series

English

The Monkey and the Turtle

Sun and Moon

Sagacious Marcela

The Story of our Fingers

Why Cocks have Combs on their Heads

The Snail and the Deer

Filipino

Ang Pagong at ang Matsing

Ang mga Paglalakbay ni Juan

Ang Pinagmulan ng Daigdig (Si Malakas at si Maganda)

Ang Unang Unggoy

Ang Alamat ng Palay

Ang Alamat ng Pinya

Stay tuned for the other stories in this podcast series!


Source:

1. Dean S. Fansler, Filipino Popular Tales. Lancaster, PA. and New York: American Folklore Society and G. E. Stechert and Co., 1921. Available from Project Gutenberg.

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